Experiences at EuroSTAR 2012 (part 2)

In the previous post I described my experiences at the Tuesday of EuroSTAR 2012. In this post I will continue my EuroSTAR experience with the Wednesday.

Changing Management Thinking – John Seddon

A nice quote from this talk about changing management thinking: “The primary cause of failing is management”. Managers tend to make decisions that are not in the benefit of projects. For example when you want to decrease the costs, managers start managing on costs… This actually increases the costs in most cases. However, when you manage on value, this will more often decrease the costs. A very useful story that John told us, was about chicken wings and spare ribs. Management of a large chain of restaurants decided to replace the spare ribs as a starter with chicken wings, since the chicken wing had a larger margin. Customers were disappointed and asked the waiters if they could get a small portion of ribs (still available as a main) as a starter. The waiters want to please their customers, so they say that it is possible. Then the fun part will start… The waiter needs to put the starter in the cash register and since there is no starter of spare ribs listed, they choose to file it under chicken wings. Since management reads the registers and sees that chicken wings are sold very often, they order more chicken wings for their restaurants. A fine example of failing management.

Adventures in Test Automation – Breaking the Boundaries of Regression Testing –

 John Fodeh

John provided information on automated monkey testing. The presentation was supported by using some scenes from the IT Crowd to inform us on automation.  Automated monkey testing p roved to be an easy to understand concept: by randomizing each step, you are simulating monkey testing. The problem of course is that it is easy to miss out on obvious defects, it does not effectively emulate real scenarios and debugging lng test runs can be quite a pain. They felt the need to create more intelligent monkeys by creating somewhat more expectable behavior via the use of state tables with probabilities per action.

Evolving Agile Testing – Fran O’Hara

After a short introduction on Agile and SCRUM, Fran started off on requirements. When we start to talk about user stories, we should try to find out about acceptance criteria for the story. This serves several goals:

  • Define the boundaries for a user story/feature
  • Help the product owner to find out what it is that delivers value
  • Help the team gain understanding of the story
  • Help developers and testers to derive tests
  • Help developers when to stop adding functionality to a story

Fran reminds us to keep these acceptance criteria at a relatively high level, so do not lose yourself in too much details. Detailing will be done in e.g wireframes, mockups or validation rules. Another place where we find detailing is in the automated acceptance tests. Try to find examples that support your acceptance criteria.

Next Fran stresses the fact that we still need test strategy in Agile. We need to think about the minimal tests in the sprints (automated unit, automated acceptance, manual exploratory) a

nd sometimes need to do some additional testing e.g for non-functionals, feature integration or business processes. The testers themselves need to have broad knowledge (more than just testing) and deep knowledge in testing. This requires a ‘technical awareness’.

Testing of Cloud Services; The Approach: From Risks to Test Measures – Kees Blokland & Jeroen Mengerink

Kees and myself presented Cloutest® our approach to testing cloud services. We started off with an introduction to cloud computing to set the context. To properly introduce the concept, we decided to use the definition provided by NIST. After this into our approach. We identified 143 risks that arise when using cloud computing and grouped these risks into categories:Cloutest-Eurostar

  • Performance
  • Security
  • Availability & Continuity
  • Functionality
  • Manageability
  • Legislation & Regulations
  • Suppliers & Outsourcing

Since 143 risks is quite a lot, we decided to give a limited set of examples of risks and detail these. For instance there occurs a performance risk, since a cloud service usually has several customers. So it’s not only you as a customer that is putting load on the service, but also other users of other customers. This will influence the performance of the service. Imagine your webshop hosted at the same hosting provider that hosts WikiLeaks… The huge amounts of traffic that a new publication on WikiLeaks will generate, might result in your webshop not being available due to performance problems of the service.

With testing we provide methods to mitigate risks, so that is what we did too. The good news is that we can still use a lot of what we have learned over the years. Some techniques need to be tweaked to fit in the cloud context, but they are very useful. Next to the tweaked measures, we also describe some new measures that we have used at our clients. We grouped the measures too:

  • Selection
  • Performance
  • Security
  • Manageability
  • Availability & Continuity
  • Functional
  • Migration
  • Legislation & Regulations
  • Production

How to test the scalability of a cloud service??? Providers promise scalable services and customers pay per use, so if you need more, you will get more. With traditional load testing, we can gradually increase the load and see how the system responds. This can be applied to the service too, but it will scale. You will see the point where the scaling starts in your response times, they will drop when more performance is added at the service. Check around the boundary of the scaling point to see if the billing is also scaled.

We see that test starts earlier, the scope is wider and testing will not stop in production.

Inspirational Talk: Sky is not the limit: Copenhagen Suborbitals – Peter Madsen

The inspirational talk was very nice, however not very test related. It showed us that with the right vision and perseverance you can reach goals that seem to be unreachable. Peter showed us how he built a homemade submarine and a homemade rocket.

Testing in China

ChinaTest 2012Last 9 days I’ve been in Shanghai together with Martin Pol for Polteq. Luckily the typhoon didn’t reach the part of Shanghai we were in, we had some wind and rain, but nothing to extreme. We’ve presented some tutorials and tracks at ChinaTest 2012, but also needed to visit a couple of companies to talk about testing. So there was a lot to do in very little time. At one company you speak with a selected group of a couple of people, where at other companies you have a room filled with about a hundred people and a video connection to other offices where also a hundred people are attending our presentation on testing. No matter what the setting was, we would get a lot of questions, since everyone wanted to learn as much as they could from our visit. This was also the case for the conference.

Together we presented a full day tutorial on structured testing. It was great to notice how people at first were a bit hesitant to ask question, but during the day dared more and more. Some concepts that require little explanation in Europe, required more in China and the other way around too. The next day of the conference Martin had one half day tutorial on compact test process improvement and I had two half day tutorials. Both of my tutorials dealt with Agile testing. The first one was on how to work as a tester in scrum teams. At some parts of the tutorial I had groups of people discuss together on some topic and then present their findings to the whole group. Usually I can follow what people talk about and try to guide them a bit in the direction I want them to think, but my Chinese is not good enough to understand the discussions 😉 So I just had to trust that they were talking about the topics I wanted them to. When we started discussing about the topics in English it became clear that they did. The other tutorial was on how to improve testing in Agile (mostly scrum) settings. What struck me was that most questions dealt with automation and tools and not the actual job of testing.

The third day of the conference started with key notes from Martin Pol and Richard Bender. After these keynotes we had to do some more company visits. The last day of the conference we both needed to do some presentations. I presented on how to test mobile apps and on the Polteq approach for testing cloud computing: Cloutest. Both of these topics proved to be very popular! Martin presented on outsourcing for a crowd that seemed to grow during the presentation. The conference ended with a set of lighting talks, where Martin told that we need to save the testing skills and I provided some fast insight into Agile.

Usually I try to provide some information on the different presentations I attended at a conference, but since these were all in Chinese there is not much that I can say about them.

I’d like to thank the organizing committee for a great conference and hope to be able to come back for the 2013 edition!

Test conferences

global

The number of events that deal with software testing seem to increase. This globalisation is great news for the testing community! More and more opportunities to share knowledge and learn from others. Last year my presentation on how to test mobile apps got to several stages and this year the release of the book Cloutest provides some opportunities for presentation slots. A presentation on Cloutest has been accepted for EuroStar and for ChinaTest. Maybe some more events will follow.

Next to Cloutest, my stage appearances will focus around Agile. China is starting to go Agile and ChinaTest has accepted two Agile proposals next to my Cloutest presentation. These will deal on how to work as a tester in Agile teams and how to improve testing in Agile settings.  The Testnet fall event also focuses on Agile, the proposal that got accepted for Testnet deals with Agile and outsourcing.

It’s great to have a lot of proposals accepted, now to prepare each presentation! For the Agile part, there are some basics that need to be dealt with in all the presentations, so let’s think about reusability 🙂 Working at Polteq provides a great setting to discuss about several testing topics. It’s great to get a lot of support and help. For Agile we recently started a discussion group, helping to see common problems and different solutions in Agile settings. Every meeting is an eye opener for me and I hope we will have a lot of informative meetings to come.

Monitor or test?

The webinar that Ruud Teunissen presented was based on the architecture of Cloutest. It was great to hear how Ruud told about the approach! I feel very proud to have contributed to this approach and to be one of the authors of the book. The cloud is hot, which was proven by the large number of questions that was asked at the end of the webinar. I want to compliment Ruud with how he handled the questions! As the result of this webinar, I hope that people realise that testing really needs to adapt to the way that software is used nowadays. Much uncertainty is introduced with the use of cloud computing, but by selecting the right service and supplier you can allready mitigate a lot of risks. Don’t forget to keep testing in production, to check if “everything still works”. One of the questions mentioned that this is monitoring and not testing. I think we need to broaden our definition of testing and make monitoring a part of testing. Realise yourself that the maintenance department might not monitor on the service, since it is maintained by the supplier… I think what needs to be done in production is testing! A continuous end-to-end test to check if the processes still work, is that monitoring or testing? Doesn’t the word test in E2E test imply a testing activity?

Edit: This topic is also active at the Cloutest site.

Cloutest launched!

It has been quiet on my blog, but it had a reason! Finally, after a year of work, the book Cloutest about testing cloud services is done!

On the 8th of March 2012 Polteq hosted a Cloutestbig event where we launched our approach on how to test cloud services (IaaS, PaaS and Saas). In the afternoon Kees Blokland and I gave a tutorial based on the book to our Polteq colleagues. While we were introducing the approach, the external guests were entertained by Lee Copeland.

In the evening, Lee started with a keynote on innovations in the test world, after which Martin Pol introduced the concept of the cloud. When he finished this introduction, it was time for Ruud Teunissen to cover the architecture of Cloutest. Cloutest consists of detailed risks that will occur when you start using cloud computing, grouped into themes. Next to these risks you will find a set of test measures. Some of them existing measures, like load testing, but nicely polished to fit the new needs we see for performance testing in the cloud. But you’ll also see new measures that stretch the definition of test. The important asset of the book is the link we made from each individual risk to the different measures needed to cover the risk.

Having the architecture clear, Kees and myself started introducing some new risks we see with cloud computing. And of course we also shared some measures with the audience e.g. on how to test the elasticity that we find in the cloud and how to deal with rules and regulations in different countries.

At the end of our event, all attendees received the book Cloutest! Feels kind of strange that people now have a book with my name on it on their bookshelves…